Fun Practice Games for Youth Football

Once the ball is high in the air, instruct the player to throw it to a receiver with an emphasis on the follow-through. Here's what it looks like: Kent Page McGroarty has worked as a writer since , contributing numerous articles to various websites. Once the player has mastered this drill, have him throw the ball and catch it with the opposite hand, then throw it and catch it with both hands at the same time. Instruct one player from each team to run out for a pass. Choose four players as hunters and put yellow shell jerseys on them to distinguish them from the others. When kids compete, they go all out.

Concentration Drill

The best conditioning drills keep fun and football situations in mind

There are endless drills to choose from, including those specific to certain positions, such as quarterback or wide receiver. Find fun drills that match the abilities of your players as well as drills that are more challenging.

Instruct a player to kneel on his throwing side knee and place the football on the ground in front of him. Have the player grab the ball with his throwing hand and lift it using the throwing hand only. Once the ball is high in the air, instruct the player to throw it to a receiver with an emphasis on the follow-through. The thrower should be able to pick up grass following the throw. Switch the knee as needed.

This drill builds arm and wrist snap strength. Divide players into two teams of six or less, though each team should have the same number of players. Assign a quarterback position to a member of each team. Instruct one player from each team to run out for a pass.

Once the player catches the pass, have him run quickly to a cone that is 20 yards away and throw the ball back to the quarterback. Players that drop the ball have to start all over; the first team that uses all of its players wins. Losing players must run laps.

This drill improves player concentration, particularly if they are feeling sluggish or tired. Set up cones or spray paint in a square formation with one cone or paint mark in the middle. The formation will look similar to the five faces on a set of dice.

Each of the five "dots" or cones should be about 1 yard apart. I used to coach that way, too. Gassers are almost always done at the end of practice, and the kids know that. So how hard do they work during that last 30 minutes leading up gassers? Do they give it everything they have? Do they leave percent of their effort on the field? Or do they do like you did in high school and save up some juice to survive gassers?

The answer often is, they conserve energy. So when players do gassers, how much better football shape do they get by running in a straight line at half-speed? When kids compete, they go all out. An example of this concept is the deer hunter game. Map out a square or circle with cones.

Single-Knee Drill